Sisters, could you wield your teaspoons?

Please, could you cast a vote in a poll?

Digital New Zealand is running a poll to determine which New Zealand publications should be digitised, to make them widely available, for everyone to access and use.

One of the publications in their poll is Broadsheet. Broadsheet was a feminist magazine in Aotearoa New Zealand. It ran from 1970 until 1990, but then the collective disbanded, and publication ceased. It was wonderfully radical. I recall that in my early career, when I was an accountant, I used to buy it and read it at the lunchtable, making my colleagues just a little uncomfortable. It’s an incredibly valuable record of second wave feminism in New Zealand, and, from memory, it also records the growing realisation of the history of colonisation in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Voting doesn’t seem to be restricted to New Zealand, so it does seem that feminists world-wide could cast a vote, and help their sisters in Aotearoa New Zealand to recover part of our history. Please, cast a vote.

Here’s how to do it.

Click here to go to the voting page for Digital New Zealand.

Scroll down to find “Broadsheet”. It took me about 10 clicks to get down to it, but if you use the “Find” function on your browser (usually under “Edit” in the menu bar), you should be able to get to it. Or you could use the “search ideas” box that appears at the top of the voting page. That’s probably the easiest way to find it.

And then, cast a vote.

That’s all you will have to do.

Please, take the time to vote. At present, the Police Gazettes and the Appendices to the Journals of the House of Representatives (AJHRS) are leading the poll. Very worthy, I’m sure, but wouldn’t it be just fantastic for feminist history to come out on top, just for once.

Click here to go to the voting page for Digital New Zealand.

Update: Jo Eaton, community manager at Digital NZ, has clarified what the voting does.

The Voting Tool is there to give a voice to people who need digital content and it is a gentle flag to copyright holders and content providers that there is a need for their content to be digitised.

There’s no competition per se, but voting for Broadsheet does send a loud clear message that it would be marvellous to have this material on-line. So keep voting! Jo has very helpfully given a direct link to the place where you can vote for Broadsheet. Click the link, and then click again, and your support for digitising Broadsheet will be registered.

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9 responses to “Sisters, could you wield your teaspoons?

  1. I was vote No 100. I subscribed to Broadsheet for years. When I left NZ I donated my copies to the Wms Studies Program at Massey.

  2. Hi there,
    Thanks for voting for ideas on DigitalNZ. We just want to clarify with you that the Voting Tool exists separately from the Make it Digital Award. A member of the public put Broadsheet in as an idea on the Voting Tool in 2009.

    The Award (http://makeit.digitalnz.org/about/award) closed on March 5th 2010. I’m afraid Broadsheet was not one of the award entries.
    A legal entity with permission to conduct digitisation was required to enter a project into the awards. You can have a look at the entries that did come in here: http://makeit.digitalnz.org/voting/tags/246/ideas

    The Voting Tool is there to give a voice to people who need digital content and it is a gentle flag to copyright holders and content providers that there is a need for their content to be digitised.
    Please keep sending people the link to vote on the idea, though (direct link to the Broadsheet entry is here: http://makeit.digitalnz.org/voting/ideas/59 ). The Voting Tool is there to enable conversation around content that people really want digitised.

  3. But the vote still sends a signal. That’s an on-going thing, as far as I can tell. Digital NZ are using it as a way to get people to indicate which items they want to be able to access. So your click has helped with that.

    Also, it’s making me wonder who holds the copyright for Broadsheet. It could be that whoever holds it is quite willing to allow it to be digitised. Then it would just (huh!) be a matter of finding the money to do it…