Friday Feminist – Ursula Le Guin

Cross posted

“Will you be about the house?” she asked him, across some distance. “Therru’s asleep. I want to walk a little.”

“Yes. Go on,” he said, and she went on, pondering the indifference of a man towards the exigencies that rule a woman: that someone must not be far from a sleeping child, that one’s freedom meant another’s unfreedom, unless some ever-changing, moving balance were reached, like the balance of a body moving forward, as she did now, on two legs, first one then the other, in the practice of that remarkable act, walking…

Ursula Le Guin, Tehanu, 1990

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4 responses to “Friday Feminist – Ursula Le Guin

  1. No one has commented on this, from my favourite writer? I will then, I was really impressed with how she rethought her previous assumptions in Tehanu and after, and mystified at the flak she copped for it.

    The Other Wind is a wonderful rounding off and insight into why that distreesing land behind the low wall existed, and how it was destroyed. Which came first, that or Pullman?

  2. There’s a discussion going on at The Hand Mirror, where I cross post these Friday Feminist quotes.

    Pullman – Northern Lights was published in 1995. Tehanu was published in 1990, but The Other Wind came out in 2001.

    Ursula Le Guin is one of my favourite writers too.

  3. I was thinking of the Amber Spyglass, which I only read once and don’t remember well, but didn’t Lyra “harrow Heaven”? I just checked my copy of AS, and copyright was 2000, so they must have come on the idea of a miserable life after death independently, not that I would have thought otherwise of either of them. I guess it’s been round since the Greeks, anyway.

  4. Leguin is still going strong into her 80s. She wrote one of my absolutely favourite books of last year, Lavinia. It tells the story of a tiny bit character from the Aeneid from her perspective. Both her relationship with the other characters, and her relationship with Vergil, who she is aware is writing her.

    Truly great book.