Star the thirtieth

I’m creating a virtual star chart, to record my progress in Dry July. The star for making it through Friday 30 July without touching the demon drink is Stellaluna, written and illustrated by Jannell Cannon.

Stellaluna is a baby fruitbat. One night, her mother is attacked by an owl, and Stellaluna loses her grip. She falls, but lands in a nest of baby birds. The birds, and Stellaluna, are very surprised, but they all try hard to make it work out. “[Stellaluna] ate bugs without making faces. She slept in the nest at night. And she didn’t hang by her feet. Stellaluna behaved as a good bird should.” By and large, she makes her new life work.

But one night, she is found by another fruitbat, who wonders why she is sleeping the wrong way up. When Stellaluna tells her story, another bat comes forward – her mother, who survived the owl attack. Stellaluna goes off joyfully with her mother, but she still remembers her bird family too, and keeps on visiting them.

I know, it sounds like a wretchedly sappy story, and I suppose that it could be, except for some lovely touches in the illustrations. The look on Stellaluna’s face as she tries to eat scritchy scratchy insects is glorious, and very funny. In the sidelines, there are small black and white illustrations, telling another story. All the time that Stellaluna is learning to be a bird, her mother is searching for her.

And I suppose that I could deconstruct the story, and instead of focusing on the themes of people (birds!) looking after the strangers in their midst, and doing their best to help them, I could read it as a story of appropriation and assimilation. But at no stage do the bats claim that bat ways are best, and nor do the birds. Each simply has a way of life that works. Moreover, the ‘message’ is not heavy handed, in the mode of The Rainbow Fish, or Milo and the Magical Stones (I don’t think I had realised until now that Marcus Pfister is responsible for both these abominations), and the story is accompanied by some seriously good notes about fruit bats. I recommend this book.

Stellaluna, by Jannell Cannon

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3 responses to “Star the thirtieth

  1. Unfortunately I cannot recommend the DVD of Stellaluna, which while beautifully animated punishes older viewers with some absolutely awful lyrics. Did I mention that it’s a musical? Of course young viewers love it and want to watch it over and over and over again.

  2. That looks pretty revolting. I’m going to scurry back and rewatch the Large Hadron Collider Rap, which Kathmandu recommended in response to my last post.

  3. The LHC rap just blew my tiny mind.