Day 3 – Frustration

Hmmm…. despite commitments to the contrary, the cabinets are not all installed, and not much more will be done until Monday. A plasterer will be coming in tomorrow to tidy up the walls ready for tiling, but otherwise, nothing will be happening for the next few days. And that’s as it should be – tradies are entitled to their weekends.

Take a look at my pantry.

(Description: Table covered with bottles and jars and tins and packets – standard pantry contents)

One table is covered with food stuffs, the other is covered with crockery, we have no stove, no sink, no dishwasher. All that we have is some promising gaps in the kitchen where such appliances will go, on Monday, or so I’m told.

Mr Strange Land is philosophical about the delays. But he is not the person who (mostly) does all the food organising and preparing around here, he has an office elsewhere to escape to, and even better for him, he’s heading out of the country for a few days, and by the time he gets back, it should all be done.

So here’s where we’re at. If you find it frustrating not finding out any more just yet, I promise you that your frustration is nothing, a mere soupçon, a bagatelle, compared to mine.

(Description: kitchen cupboards, covered with long bench, angular piece of wood on top of bench, at far end, various cabinets, general air of half-way there)

Earlier posts in this series: Day 1 – The problem, Day 2 – Deconstruction

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7 responses to “Day 3 – Frustration

  1. My wife and I are currently building a house that is running a couple of months behind schedule. Not a problem with the speed of the tradies but the scheduling by the builder- lots of gaps where nothing happens.

    But one thing we have noticed is that self employed tradies often work weekends, public holidays and don’t take as many weeks off over xmas. Those who are directly employed only very rarely work weekends.

  2. Raymond A Francis

    I did not want to rain on your parade and for all I know Australia might be diferent but kitchens and bathrooms never go to schedule
    I think it is because so many different trades are involved
    A month plus and still waiting for the second bathroom to tiled
    We washed out of a bucket for three days but have had a functional shower since
    I think we lived with only a BBQ and a microwave for three weeks while the kichen was done
    Both big jobs and well worth the wait but you have to remember patience is a virtue

  3. ‘Though we’ve gone with a company who project manage all this for us, including co-ordinating all the tradies. It will get done fairly quickly, but they didn’t talk me through the timetable, and gave me some unrealistic expectations. They do kitchens all the time, so they know about these things, but I don’t, so I was relying on the verbal expectations they gave me. Also, it seems that their office messed up, and didn’t send the timetable letter to me. If they had, I wouldn’t have agreed to a timing that left me without a kitchen over the weekend (two extra nights without); I would have asked them to schedule it all to start on a Monday or Tuesday.

    Having said all that, once they realised what had happened, they have made a big effort to get everything happening. And the people they have doing the work seem to be highly competent and focused. All the cabinets they have installed so far are beautifully made, and I think the design is going to work well. I’ll post about that once we’ve got it mostly done (hopefully Monday or Tuesday evening).

  4. It’s a guilt free excuse for takeaway nights in front of the telly. The bits that are in look lovely. I can understand why you are keen to get cooking in there.

  5. This looks much better planned – you’ll love it.
    We were 18 months with just a microwave and one hot plate, waiting for work on other rooms and an extension to finish before the kitchen got started. A laundry makes a reasonable substitute kitchen.
    Now it’s all finished, and the kitchen installer wants a photo for her brag book – so I know how delighted you will be when yours is up and running.

  6. Just focus on how great it’ll be once it’s all finished.

  7. We’ve almost finished renovating a crib.

    We didn’t have to live in it while the work was going on but it still wasn’t easy.

    That experience confirms lessons learned with previous building projects – it always takes longer and costs more than you expect – but it is worth it when it’s finished.